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ENGINEER  AND  INVENTOR  April 1893

Engineering industry gossip

Gossip from the engineering industry, 1893
photo  acknowledgement to Kateryna Babaieva on Pexels

Electricity continues to dazzle the world with its wonderful achievements. Cucumbers and lettuce are now manufactured in large quantities, by the aid of electric lights, and raw spirit is converted in a minute, by an electric current, into 20-year old whiskey.

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A glass factory in Liverpool, England, has glass journal boxes for all its machinery, a glass floor, glass shingles on the roof, and a glass smokestack 105 feet high built wholly of glass bricks, a foot square.

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Shoe Manufacturing

A Brockton manufacturer began shoe-making twenty-five years ago with a capital of three hundred dollars. At the expiration of the first year he had lost that sum and was six hundred dollars in debt. Not discouraged, he incurred additional obligations and continued business. When the second year ended he had made five thousand dollars. Since then he has been uniformly prosperous.

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Church bells were first made by Paulinus, an Italian bishop, to drive away demons about 400 A.D.

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Report on Steam trials of HMS Hercules

Gossip from the engineering industry, 1893
painting  HMS Hercules by Henry Morgan (wikimedia)

The British warship HMS Hercules has completed her steam trials off Portsmouth, England. Ever since this ship was re-engined with modern machinery she has given trouble. This trouble has arisen principally through the excessive noise and vibration produced by the propellers at all rates of speed; subsequently two blades were removed, and the remainder reduced in diameter. The clearance thus served to reduce the disturbance, but not entirely, and it was afterward experimentally decided to push the propeller about eight inches further to the rear, and to give the blades an outward twist, so as to throw the wash away from the ship's counter. The results obtained were so satisfactory that a fourbladed propeller of similar contour will be fitted.

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It only a few of the many schemes for the eliminating of smoke during combustion which are now being experimented will prove as efficacious as expected, the article a few years hence will be scarcely more than a tradition.

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Heated Journals

Engineers are quite interested in a device lately brought forward for sounding an alarm whenever a bearing gets hot. The arrangement consists of a cup containing some mercury, this cup being set in the bearing, and wires are connected from the cup to a bell and annunciator, one of the wires leading from a screw that can be set at any desired distance from the surface of the mercury; this screw is screwed down until it touches the mercury, and the circuit completed through the mercury, causing the bell to ring, and the screw is then backed any distance required. Should the bearing become heated, the mercury expands, closing the circuit when it touches the screw, and thus giving the alarm. It is proposed to have one on each bearing, the belief being expressed that, though this would lead to a multiplicity of numbers, and probably some confusion at times, no doubt can be entertained that it would save fires very often in such places saw-mills: also in some portions of cotton mills, where dust is likely to get into a bearing and cause it to heat, the arrangement, it is thought, may serve a useful purpose.

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The planing machine was the work of Woodworth in 1828.

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For clinical work a Frenchman has devised an exceedingly delicate and quick-reading electrical thermometer, capable of showing a variation in temperature of 1/20th of a degree Centigrade.

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Manufacturers, as well as the public in general, are pleased to learn that the so-called coal trust is on the verge of dissolution. If ever a combination was conceived in iniquity it was this. The manner in which the public has been compelled by the monopoly to pay exorbitant prices for coal has been absolutely excuseless.

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The Hamilton Steamboat Company's new wharf at the Beach will have to be rebuilt, as the ice smashed it completely. Most of the material was saved.

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The Canadian party appointed to survey and locate the international boundry line between Alaska anb British Columbia left Ottawa for Victoria, B.C.

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About this article

This article is a reprint of an existing article from Engineer and Inventor, April 1893. It is the intent of this website to present this article in human and machine readable form. Format and editing changes have been made. This article is provided for the purpose of enjoyment only. Statements in this article were relevant to the published period and may not be applicable in current times.